NOW PLAYING

opens friday

in theaters


new on DVD/BluRay


review index

HOT TOPICS



CLASSIC OF THE MOMENT

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

 

Welcome

The Film Experience™ was created by Nathaniel R


 Gemini, Cinephile, Actressexual. Also loves cats. All material herein is written and copyrighted by him, unless otherwise noted. twitter | facebook | pinterest | tumblr | letterboxd

 

Powered by Squarespace
Comment Fun

COMMENT(s) DU JOUR
CHAOS REIGNS!
WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE SURREAL ANIMAL MOMENTS IN MOVIES?

"The cow on the roof of the house in O Brother Where Art Thou-tombeet

"There is a snake in The Thin Red Line that is both surreal and real. It just suddenly appears on screen, this angry, probably poisonous snake during a battle and jolts you out of the fear of bullets into a fear of nature..........then it's back to bullets." -henry

Keep TFE Strong

Your suscription dimes make an enormous difference to The Film Experience in terms of stability and budget to dream bigger. Consider...

I ♥ The Film Experience

THANKS IN ADVANCE

For those who can't commit to a dime a day, consider a one time donation for an article or a series you are glad you didn't have to live without.

What'cha Looking For?
Subscribe

 

10th Annual Site Awards. (For Film Released in NYC in the 2009 Calendar Year)

BEST PICTURE

 AVATAR
James Cameron
(Dec 18th, 20th Century Fox)
BRIGHT STAR
Jane Campion
(Sept 18th, Apparition)
 HUNGER
Steve McQueen
(March 20th, IFC)
 THE HURT LOCKER
Kathryn Bigelow
(June 26th, Summit)
 PRECIOUS
Lee Daniels
(Nov 6th, Lionsgate)
 This thrillingly imagined and yes hokey but so what? envelope-pushing scifi epic is a transporting adventure. Best scene: Taming the dragon.
Campion's cinematic poetry rivals the beauty of John Keats' own. They make a heavenly match for this fragile romance. Best scene: Kiss in woods.
This severe prison drama and death-watch for Bobby Sands is bold cinema. It makes apocalyptic dramas look like Disney films. Best scene: The wee foal.
Bomb squad drama finds explosive force in human implosion. Best scene: There's more then one? Repetitve structure is half the impact.
What ever its flaws, its heart pumps out copious and remarkable blood sweat and tears out to seal all its cracks. Best scene: Mary's confession.
 
Gold: THE HURT LOCKER Silver: HUNGER  Bronze: BRIGHT STAR

Rest of the top ten: Inglourious Basterds, Summer Hours, Up in the Air, Coraline and (500) Days of Summer.
Top dozen? Whip It and Up.

 

BEST DIRECTOR

 Kathryn Bigelow
THE HURT LOCKER
 James Cameron
AVATAR
 Jane Campion
BRIGHT STAR
 Steve McQueen
HUNGER
Quentin Tarantino
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS
 She can do it all: action, character, atmosphere, theme. She can do it all simultaneously.
 For pushing the medium while also reminding Hollywood how one  directs action. They do forget.
Her skills are undiminished. Her singular eye imparts ethereal beauty and compassion.
For his cinematic artistry, that daring discipline in the telling and the whole blunt force of the thing.
 He alchemized his love of cinema into a sophisticated silly and totally singular movie about the movies.
 
Gold: BIGELOW Silver: MCQUEEN Bronze: CAMPION

Finalists: Olivier Assayas adds Summer Hours to the growing case that he's one of the most intelligent and versatile | Spike Jonze takes childhood seriously for Wher the Wild Things Are and remember its swirling magical mix of moods, wonder and confusion.
Semi-Finalists: Marc Webb for (500) Days of Summer | Neill Blomkamp for District 9 | Jason Reitman for Up in the Air | Michael Haneke for The White Ribbon | Erick Zonca for Julia.

 

 

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

 Scott Neustadter & Michael Weber
(500) DAYS OF SUMMER
 Mark Boal
THE HURT LOCKER
Quentin Tarantino
INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS
 Sebastián Silva & Pedro Peirano
THE MAID
 Olivier Assayas
SUMMER HOURS
 Wonderfully adept at being two films at once, depending on what kind of romantic fool is watching. And it's funny, too.
A confident minimal structural skeleton adorned with the meat of character and true thematic muscle.
We need his singular voice. Tarantino isn't exactly disciplined but his verbal dexterity and those daring flourishes are thrilling.
 "The help" is poor but the film earns its riches. Familiar beats comes with complicating details and it all feels very organic.
This gifted writer/director baldly states his themes here but he speaks with grace and reaches profundity.
 
Gold: INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS Silver: SUMMER HOURS Bronze: THE HURT LOCKER

Finalists: Campion's indelible sings the aria of Fanny & John.
Semi-Finalists: The White Ribbon Michael Haneke | Julia Aude Py & Erick Zonca | A Serious Man Joel & Ethan Coen.

 

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

 Wes Anderson & Noah Baumbach
FANTASTIC MR. FOX
Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci, Tony Roache and Ian Martin
IN THE LOOP
Geoffrey Fletcher
PRECIOUS
 Jason Reitman & Sheldon Turner
UP IN THE AIR
 Spike Jonze & Dave Eggers
WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE
Not one but two children's books inspired fine films this year. Roald Dahl's book makes for a near perfect Wes Anderson film, doesn't it?
This offshoot of The Thick of It does sometimes feel like a TV show... but a brilliantly written one with rapid fire delivery and cutting wit.
The title Precious Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire is unwieldy but it illustrates the love the movie holds for the novel. Plus: that dialogue!
 Walter Kim's novel boards the screen. The message may be a touch glib to some but it's wonderful to hear wordy adult banter on the screen again.
Maurice Sendak's classic lonely tale of a boy's imagination gets a wise and moving companion piece (rather than a lazy xerox) as playmate.
 
Gold: IN THE LOOP Silver: PRECIOUS Bronze: FANTASTIC MR FOX

Finalists: Whip It in which Shauna Cross adapts her own memoirs | Coraline in which Henry Selick visualizes Neil Gaiman's classic (which is, coincidentally, a fine companion piece to Where the Wild Things Are)
Semi-Finalists: Michael Hoffman adapts Jay Parini's novel The Last Station | Scott Teems expands William Gay's short story That Evening Sun Go Down into That Evening Sun | Joe Penhall walks down Cormac McCarthy's The  Road | Neill Blomkamp and Terri Pritchard adapt the short film District 9.