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« Sam Shepard (1943-2017) | Main | The Furniture Index »
Monday
Jul312017

Beauty vs Beast: Children of the Night

Jason from MNPP here with this week's brand new edition of "Beauty vs Beast." Isn't it weird that Marvel says they have no current plans to reboot the Blade series? I know, I know, we're supposed to be against reboots. But Blade is a great character with great name recognition, and he's a great character with great name recognition of color on top of that, so maybe we should set aside our prejudices in this instance. It has been thirteen years since the last film, after all. I really like the original Blade trilogy though, and so here on Wesley Snipes' 55th birthday let's give some love to the original 1998 film, which I've always in particular had a soft spot for... especially with regards to its bad guy played by a sleazily charismatic Stephen Dorff.

PREVIOUSLY Last week we wandered into the land of Gilead and faced off the Emmy nominated ladies of The Handmaid's Tale - sure enough voting for a bitter pill like Ann Dowd's villainous Aunt proved difficult in our current political situation and Elisabeth Moss took a whopping 80% of your vote. Said Duncan Dykes:

"Such great scene partners - feeding off of each other and selling the dystopian world better than any production design or visual effects could.... Points to Ann Dowd for consistently unexpected characterization - her apparently genuine care for some of the girls (Janine in particular, striking considering her initial torture of her) adds shades of humanity to her in most unnerving ways. She speaks more like a preacher or particularly disapproving parent than a general or warden, which makes the character all the more intriguing.

Ultimately however you have to go with Elisabeth Moss for a spellbinding symphony of a performance - deeply felt humanity, her drained voice and face, the precision of her furtive glances of longing or fear or paranoia or anger. She spends such stretches of the show with everything on the inside that when she gets to let loose and expose traces of the fury she feels regarding her situation, it leaves you shaking. Brava."

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Reader Comments (3)

I remember really loving Steven Dorff in this movie but perhaps the reason it isn't getting rebooted is that vampires are so passe. it's all about zombies now.

July 31, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterNATHANIEL R

It's hard to imagine anyone other than Wesley Snipes in the Blade character. He totally endorsed the character. Even so the film belongs to Stephen Dorff and his charismatic, strong, confident, evil performance. He dominates the film and his presence is missed in the next movies.

August 7, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterHarmodio

Nat & Harmodio: I doubt Marvel Studios isn't trying to work on some sort of franchise along the "monster hunting" ground, but the real problem is that the Blade series was NEVER a popular enough franchise to justify focus over unadapted pieces of their iconography. On budgets of $45, $54 and $65 million for 1, 2 and Trinity, the Blade series pulled in gross results of $131, $155 and $129 million, respectively. What would your call be?

August 7, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterVolvagia

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