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« What's Next for Jennifer Lawrence | Main | TIFF's Red Carpet, Much Improved »
Wednesday
Sep162015

TIFF: Jake Gyllenhaal in "Demolition"

This review originally appeared in abridged version in Nathaniel's column at Towleroad

All throughout Demolition, which opened the 40th annual Toronto International Film Festival which closes this coming Sunday, new widower Davis Mitchell (Jake Gyllenhaal) is putting the title into action. His wife has just died, he is convinced he feels nothing about it, and he begins to tear things down and scatter their parts about. The general idea is ‘take something apart to see how it all fits together’ but he doesn’t bother with the fitting back together part.

He’s also demolitioning his own life, of course, in the process. This peculiar destructive streak starts out small with his morning routine. At first, in montage, this includes lots of preening and shaving (including his chest. *sniffle*) to turn him into a smooth starched and well dressed executive but it’s quickly abandoned. Cue: sexy scruff and increasingly erratic behavior. (Unfortunately we are not shown the return of the chest hair. Stingy move, movie!)

Everything has become a metaphor…”

…Davis intones in the middle of the picture to his confused and impatient boss and father-in-law (Chris Cooper), as an attempt to explain his new and frankly worrisome headspace. But he’s right. Everything is a metaphor in Demolition and thus, apart from Gyllenhaal’s work, the movie sparked polarized reactions. More...

To make sure you got the metaphor bit, Davis repeats himself and then rephrases. It’s a neat Defense Against the Dark Arts (of Criticism) trick: build armor into your film by pointing out its vulnerabilities. Most of what you might snarkily say about Demolition, it’s irreverently already said about itself.

If you’re trying to put something as gimmicky or audibly scripted as this over, you want Gyllenhaal as your spokesperson. Ever since his career nadir in 2010 with two high profile flops in Prince of Persia and Love and Other Drugs (speaking of chest hair or lack thereof) he’s been taking risks and making wise choices. And since this report comes to you from Toronto, it’s safe to say that he enjoys Canadian filmmakers since Denis Villeneuve and Jean-Marc Vallée have directed half of his last six pictures between them. End of Watch, Prisoners, Enemy, Nightcrawler, and Southpaw (his most recent before Demolition) are a remarkable quintet of diverse, moody, and award-worthy performances.

Jake & Naomi frolicFrankly, he’s earned a bit of showing off. And show off he does in this weird and dazzling star turn. Davis is much closer to a “movie character” than a real person; he writes TMI complaint letters to customers, pays construction workers to let him do their jobs for them, dances in public, and so on. Jake plays him big, turning the Movie Star Mojo way up but keeping Davis just stiff, dead-eyed and off-putting enough to make you alarmed about his mental health and just loose, lost-soul, and funny enough to keep him endearing.

In other words his deft star turn allows you to enjoy laughing at this man’s tailspin while simultaneously hoping he pulls out of it.

Unfortunately he’s running rings around the movie. Some of it is just too implausible to be anything other than “Outrageous Movie!” and there’s really no excuse for one scene involving firearms that seems downright irresponsible. Plus the movie has female trouble. The deceased wife, viewed frequently in flashbacks, is a good stand-in for the other female characters since she doesn’t really exist but in connection to Davis. Naomi Watts’s Karen, who works in customer service and pursues a very odd friendship with Davis, is in her own way, just as weird as her new friend. But the movie loses interest in her altogether once Davis starts hanging out with her queer teenage son.

Is Demolition disingenuous or deeply felt? Manufactured or moving? It's a little of all of those things but the answer doesn’t matter when the movie is at its weirdest, funniest, or most cathartic. Gyllenhaalics should line right up when they release it early next year but anyone with a low tolerance for quirk and metaphor should steer clear.

Grade: Jake: A; Movie: C+
Oscar Chances: We’ll here’s the thing. Demolition, perhaps sensing it was safer as a commercial play, rather than an Oscar contender (though frankly the Metaphor-Loving Writers Branch of the Academy might have taken a shine to its screenplay) has relocated itself to 1st quarter 2016. Kris Tapley pointed out in Variety that Jake Gyllenhaal was probably its only Oscar play. But Best Actor is never not competitive and, sadly, as we learned with Nightcrawler last year, being a great actor who looks like a movie star (i.e. Jake Gyllenhaal) does not guarantee you Oscar favor unless you’re willing to go the safer route: biopics and the like. Gyllenhaal, to his credit, does not seem at all interested in choosing the safest route these days. We’re happy to join him on the more trecherous paths.

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Reader Comments (11)

Hopefully we will one day talk about the 4 Oscar winning leads from "Brokeback Mountain."

September 16, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterPatryk

^ never thought of that! That would be amazing.

September 16, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterJoe

SPOILERS ALERT:

I don't want Jake in Leo DiCaprio's Dead Wives/Fiancees Club (Moonlight Mile, Enemy, Southpaw, Demolition).

September 17, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterPaul Outlaw

I have infinite tenderness for you too.

September 17, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterPeggy Sue

Both Dicaprio and Gylenhaal are worthy of Oscars soon. Jake has three films this year - Southpaw, Joy and Demolition.

I think he may be a shoo in for Supporting Actor for JOY.

September 17, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterBette Streep

BS, do you mean Everest?

September 17, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterPaul Outlaw

Bradley Cooper is in Joy, not Jake Gylenhaal. No one in Everest has gotten rapturous reviews.

September 17, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterMareko

I was less interested when I heard the word shaving.

September 17, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterMARK

thank you for this great review

September 18, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterIvonne

The synopsis sounds very similar to an Australian movie from a few years ago starring Matthew Goode, BURNING MAN.

September 18, 2015 | Unregistered CommenterTravis C

@ Paul Outlaw, his character arcs in Nocturnal Animals, as Mermelstein, and Stronger will serve up the antidote.
There is a gradual process of emergent self awareness throughout his interpretations.
"Regeneration" comes only after stasis, disease, and death (or ~demolition).
Even The Current War is the flipside of Nightcrawler.

November 20, 2015 | Unregistered Commenterkatz

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