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Entries in Teresa Wright (6)


Smackdown 1941: Margaret, Mary, Sara, Patricia & Teresa

Behold the Supporting Actresses of 1941, two stalwart mothers, two helpless pawns, and one reckless diva. All but one of them, the diva and eventual winner, were in Best Picture nominees in this highly satisfying Oscar showdown.


Allgood, Astor, Collinge, Wright, and Wycherley

Oscar had entered its teenage years by 1941, (14th annual Academy Awards) but it was still a green enough institution that all of its supporting actresses were first timers. Mary Astor, who won the Oscar, was the only star among the nominees and she was having a great year also starring in the noir classic The Maltese Falcon. Career momentum issues should never be underestimated with Oscar outcomes. Astor was joined in the shortlist by two sturdy character players in their 60s: the British stage actress Margaret Wycherley and the Irish screen actress Sara Allgood (who had been featured in some early Alfred Hitchcock movies). Rounding out the nominee list were two true finds making their charmed film debuts in the Best Picture nominee The Little Foxes, Patricia Collinge and Teresa Wright, the latter of whom was an instant darling in Hollywood and would win the Oscar the following year for Mrs Miniver. There's that momentum factor again.


Angelica Jade Bastien, Anne Marie, Nick Davis, Nathaniel R, Stinkylulu and You - we tabulate reader votes and quotes from your ballots appear!

Without further ado, the main event...


SARA ALLGOOD as "Mrs. Morgan" in How Green Was My Valley
Synopsis: A mother of six boys and one girl watches her family come apart over the ravages of coal mining on their once idyllic town
Stats: 62 yrs old. First and only nom. 36 minutes of screen time (or 30% of running time). 

Angelica: Warmth, teary-eyed noble sense of self, and protectiveness indicative of a mother figure in a picture that displays the ways things were. There are brief, interesting flashes that give her character more weight but even then it isn’t a performance I would care to revisit or even felt particularly moved by. ♥♥

Anne Marie: The Academy does love its long-suffering mothers. Allgood is appropriately fierce and folksy. Unfortunately, she's never given much to do. Her banter with the father is great and she does bring some humor, but at no point does Allgood play Mrs. Morgan as a believable three-dimensional character instead of Welsh window dressing. Allgood adds little to the film besides extra saccharine nostalgia-- something with which How Green Was My Valley already overflowed.  ♥♥

Nathaniel: Her famous mother tiger speech with an elemental storm whipping up around her is actually the least of it. It's in the gestures and physicality that she transcends: leaning defeated against her doorway, a hilariously broad moment with socks and shoes, arms outstretched or swiping at her sons and husband, and two wrenching atypically still moments (involving gossip and a mining accident, respectively) when she's lost in worrying thought. It's silent film acting at its best and who needs the sound in How Green Was My Valley anyway? ♥♥♥♥

Nick: Allgood’s fairly generic and physically typecast as the stalwart mother in Ford’s mining-town memory-piece, winning her nomination by being one of few women in a male-driven frontrunner. Her big scene admonishing strikers who have ostracized her husband feels awkward and unmodulated. She’s better with a late, blank-faced close-up before an empty elevator platform, but she’s just delivering on directorial instructions.  I see few of the subtleties an Anne Revere might have brought to this part   

Readers: "Essentially pretty thin but leaves a fond memory nonetheless. She's playing a cliche, and more or less playing into the cliche but she's adorable at it.." - Goran  (reader avg: ♥♥♥¼

StinkyLulu: Allgood’s Mother Morgan feels like a collection of snapshots gathered in a scrapbook. Her declamatory zeal and stalwart spirit vividly animate this archetype in the instant (and in ways that reveal the actress’s roots in the Irish theater). But her captivating constancy seems to lack the independently clarifying continuity necessary to cue a coherent characterization amongst the scattered, glancing episodes the film affords her. ♥♥

Actress earns 14¼ ❤s

MARY ASTOR as "Sandra Kovak" in The Great Lie
Synopsis: a famous concert pianist becomes pregnant with the child of another woman's man
Stats: 35 yrs old. First and only nomination. 47 minutes of screen time (or 43% of running time). 

Angelica: Astor is a maelstrom of female desire. For the most part she is able to strike the right balance between the glamour, vulnerability and the surreal nature needed for women’s pictures. Even better she looks like she’s having fun while doing so. She especially does interesting things with her voice as she purrs, cracks, and devours her way through the film. ♥♥♥♥

Anne Marie: In a diva-off, Astor goes at Bette Davis with her well-manicured claws out and damn near walks away with the picture. Considering the film, that's not saying much. The Great Lie thrives on its leading ladies' explosive rivalry. Whenever they're apart, the seams in the melodrama begin to show. Astor throws shade like a pro, but she can't distract from a ridiculous film. A fun performance, but ultimately unworthy of an Oscar win.  ♥♥♥

Nathaniel: The Great Lie requires more than a few scenes for acclimation - yes, you're watching a Bette Davis movie in which a chain-smoking love-to-hate-her diva drops death stares with quips and that woman is NOT Bette Davis. Astor struts around with such supreme entitlement that you absolutely believe that she thinks of Davis as her supporting actress. Astor's hot exclamatory moods and chilly threats reverberate in exactly the same way those huge chords she keeps dropping on the piano, do -- BOOM! Here's your drama, bitch. ♥♥♥♥

Nick: Astor plays her first scene as comedy; you can see The Palm Beach Story around the corner. Later, she reprises some cooped-up anguish from Red Dust, pitched even higher.  She and Goulding let the tones in her performance veer a little broadly… but she’s still typically entrancing. Her physical gestures, her implacable will, her acting of the character’s own acting, her brilliant reading of the one-word line “Money”: they all make her a worthy duet-partner with Davis, elevating the tawdry Great Lie into something special. ♥♥♥♥ 

Readers: "Glorious. Thanks to Mary's enormous skill rather than being offputting she's fascinating." - Joel  (reader avg: ♥♥♥♥

StinkyLulu: True, I never quite buy the character’s supposed dissoluteness (and — with George Brent at the tip — this is one tepid love triangle). Even so, Mary Astor’s arch, aristocratic vulnerability in the role of hard-partying, pampered recording artist is somehow genuinely compelling. But Astor’s most enduring, most delicious accomplishment here? Being the femme formidable enough to bring out the stone butch we all knew lived deep inside Bette Davis. ♥♥♥♥

Actress earns 23 ❤s


PATRICIA COLLINGE as "Birdie Hubbard" in The Little Foxes
Synopsis: an alcoholic mistreated wife warns her beloved niece, who she worries will end up just like her, about the lack of love in her family
Stats: Then 49 yrs old. Film debut! First and only nod. 21 minutes of screen time (or 18% of running time). 

Angelica: Bringing almost harsh buoyancy to the role. The most moving, powerful moments are when we see how utterly depressed she is at the lack of worth she carries in her family. In these solemn moments we can see how depression changes the architecture of her face, the slope of her shoulders, creates subtle changes in her voice. While she can’t wrestle away the attention away from its lead she is an interesting counterpoint of older, southern femininity to Bette Davis’s Regina. ♥♥♥♥

Anne Marie: Lillian Hellman wrote Birdie to be a symbol of the genteel South that was destroyed by Reconstruction. Patricia Collinge makes Birdie Hubbard into something more: a fragile, whole woman, layering constant fear with hopeful sweetness. Each time she’s abused, Birdie crumbles a little further before shoring herself up behind a flimsy smile. Rather than fall into martyrdom, Collinge tempers Birdie’s victimhood with the wisdom that Birdie’s most pitiable pain comes from her desperation to be loved.  ♥♥♥♥♥

Nathaniel: Whole scenes go by in which we only see her, if we see her at all, observing silently, dead still, from a corner; she's mere wallpaper to the vipers around her. The character's story may be over-explained in a final monologue (we got the gist from Collinge's work) but the actress wrings it for maximum anxious humanity and absolutely sells the depth of affection and alarm for her niece in two gorgeous face-dropping sequences. ♥♥♥♥

Nick: Birdie Hubbard, the “Aunt Fanny” of The Little Foxes, is less formidable than Agnes Moorehead in Ambersons but Collinge endows her with comparable charisma, making her loneliness and blather into something magnetic.  Her tipsy showcase monologue discloses brutal self-awareness but not total self-awareness; she doesn’t redeem Birdie’s dissipation as a removable veil or unfair projection.  Sad, funny, earnest, she safeguards the crucial “sym-” in “sympathetic” and communicates wonderfully in deep-focus backgrounds without pulling focus. ♥♥♥♥ 

Readers: "In an often icy film about reducing life to a financial transaction, Collinge makes her very humanity read as cumbersome baggage to her husband's success, profoundly earning her character's tragedy." -Sean D. (reader avg: ♥♥♥♥

StinkyLulu: Collinge has such a clear handle on the character of Birdie Hubbard — perhaps the most tragic flibbertigibbet in all of American dramaturgy — that it’s a shame that neither she nor Wyler seemed to quite figure out how to bring that clarity to camera. I remain convinced that Collinge is delivering a devastating performance; it just happens to be right outside of (or simply flattened by) Wyler’s frame. ♥♥

Actress earns 23 ❤s


TERESA WRIGHT as "Alexandra Giddens" in The Little Foxes
Synopsis: A young woman tries to make sense of her family's shady dealings as her goodhearted father takes ill and a reporter comes courting
Stats: 23 yrs old. Film debut! First of three noms. 41 minutes of screen time (or 35% of running time). 

Angelica: Even though I’ve seen this film several times one constant remains: how much this performance annoys me. In the beginning, she comes off as almost too naïve and wide-eyed. Her innocence isn’t lovely but shrill. She gets more interesting shadings as she questions her mother. But still she brings little nuance or depth to a role of a young girl finding her sense of self in the shadow of a monstrous mother figure. ♥♥

Anne Marie: Someone has to be the soul of the film. Xandra spends a lot of time being lectured to, but Wright plays her as an active, empathetic listener. Even if she's heavy-handed with Xandra’s more petty and childish side, her commitment justifies that dramatic turn in the last act. Wright would play a similar character in Shadow of a Doubt, and maturity would give her the ability to build a steadier character arc.  ♥♥♥♥

Nathaniel: Teresa's brand of noble and naive earnestness, too pure to be completely undone by the hard truths she suddenly learns about a monstrous loved one only works for me in Shadow of a Doubt (1943) but I'm glad she had this arc to play for a dry run of that vastly improved star turn. But in this utterly amazing ensemble and this fine Oscar shortlist, she's the weak link, however capable she is at dramatizing true affection and dim awareness. ♥♥

Nick: By 1943’s Shadow of a Doubt, Wright nailed her distinctive balance of sweetness and mettle.  In The Little Foxes, she’s just getting started.  I’m not yet fully sold.  My favorite moments involve her quizzical, slightly shamed response to her semi-suitor’s excitement that she’s finally defying her mother—as if she never perceived her own acquiescence.  But she overdoes girlish naïveté in early scenes and could afford a smidge more power in later ones.  ♥♥ 

Readers: "This year's theme seems to be that Bette Davis elevates all her costars' performances..." -Suzanne (reader avg: ♥♥⅓

StinkyLulu: Teresa Wright is absolutely adequate as the young Alexandra, reliable and effective, playing childlike innocence as plausibly as she conveys early onset cynicism. Though her handling of Hellman’s declamatory chatter might be less expert than the old pros surrounding her, Wright’s vivid acuity delivers her best moments, especially as she “listens” and learns. ♥♥

Actress earns 14⅓ ❤s

MARGARET WYCHERLEY as "Mother York" in Sergeant York
Synopsis: A farm widow worries and prays for her wayward eldest as he tries to find his way in the world before leaving for war
Stats: 60 yrs old. First and only nom. 18 minutes screen time (or 13% of running time). 

Angelica: There is a quiet presence and wisdom brought to the role. But at the same time even if she plays the role well she plays it exactly as expected. There is no interior life to the character so maybe I shouldn’t be too surprised at how little of an impression she left on me. ♥♥

Anne Marie: Another fiery, folksy mother, this time the American model. Like Allgood, Wycherly doesn't get much to do except act noble, inspire nostalgia, and quote the Bible. Wycherly played a terrifying mother in White Heat, so she clearly had the ability to create vibrant characters, even if her limited screentime prevents her from doing so in Sergeant York. When playing poor-but-proud characters, there’s a difference between “simple” and “simplistic.” Unfortunately, Wycherly's Ma York is the latter.  

Nathaniel: The filmmaking does all the heavy-lifting, continually cueing up a reverent theme when Mother York enters a frame, but it rarely asks much of her once it's given Still and all, in a sea of broad ACTING caricatures and bizarre Tennessee accents, she manages a surprising amount of earth-worn toplands authenticity. And I love her lack of sentiment when eyeing her wayward son. ♥♥

Nick: A distinguished graduate from the Of Beulah Bondage school of supporting actressing, Wycherly brings a similar, rough-hewn, cabin-folks understatement to all her scenes—even a late reunion that could easily have gone lachrymose. Such consistency, clearly enforced by her director, speaks to both the performer’s admirable resolve and the limited parameters of the role, as conceived and executed.  Points for her distracted fingering of a wicker basket while defending her son from local judgment. Business!  ♥♥

Readers: "Ma York may not say a lot, but still waters run deep, thanks to Wycherly." - Tom G.  (reader avg: ♥♥

StinkyLulu: At first, Margaret Wycherly’s cadaverous clarity in the role of Sergeant York’s mother freaked me out. (Was she the live model for the witch in Snow White or what?) Then I became fascinated by (and even fond of)  Wycherly’s “Country Crone” version of archetypal mother love. Sure, it’s all penetrating gazes and impenetrably homespun homilies, but Wycherly’s clarifying presence anchors this film’s (and Cooper’s) unexpected effectiveness, which is sorta what actressing at the edges is all about. ♥♥♥

Actress earns 12 ❤s


Oscar chose Mary Astor, the most famous and accomplished of the nominees prior to 1941. The Smackdown panel loved her, too. But maybe we should have Bette Davis, 1941's good luck charm in this category, break the news to her.

Look at it this way, Mary. We already shared a man and a child... You have practice!

Mary Astor has to share the Smackdown win!  In a shocker, despite five panelists and all reader ballots tabulated, we have to call it a draw.

The winners are Mary Astor & Patricia Collinge in a tie! 


Thank you for attending! 
If you enjoyed it, share it on facebook or twitter or other social media sites. Surely you have a friend who loves Old Hollywood! If you're new to the Smackdown we've revisited 1952's pie-throwing brawl,  1968's sinister sapphics, 1980's warm hugs, and 2003's messy histrionics. Previously over 30 Smackdowns were hosted @ StinkyLulu's old site

Further Reading? If you'd like to dig deeper, here's the way these five characters are introduced, a tribute to How Green Was My Valley, and the Best Leading Actress (non-Oscared) from '41, twice over. Our panel also sounded off on other Supporting Actresses worth your time

What's next for the Smackdown?
We've scheduled this whole summer in advance for your viewing pleasure. For June we'll be celebrating 1964 all month (consider it a 50th anniversary spectacular) so queue up a storied and interesting quintet of films: My Fair Lady, The Chalk Garden, The Night of the Iguana, Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte, and Zorba the Greek and join us by sending in your reader ranked votes and commenting on the '64 festivities. In addition to the Smackdown fiilms, we'll look at the James Bond film Goldfinger and possibly a few more titles to be determined.. Any requests?


Introducing... The Supporting Actresses of 1941

The next Supporting Actress Smackdown hits this coming Saturday and you can still vote as part of the panel. Your votes count toward the outcome since one of the panelists spots is for the readers! We'll look at How Green Was My Valley for Best Shot late tonight but for now, it's another edition of "Introducing..." How do we first meet these 1941 characters who will then grant their actresses the honor of becoming Academy Awards Nominees? Was the direction, music and lighting already helping to single these ladies out for honors?

Here's how they're introduced in their films...

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Jennifer Lawrence and the Youngest To...

With her nomination for American Hustle this morning, Jennifer Lawrence has become the youngest actor of either gender to receive her third Oscar nomination. She is only 23. Or, if you'd like to get technical about it, 23 years 5 months and 2 days. Whether you think her work in American Hustle is great or terrible (and factions have formed on both sides) or you have a more nuanced perspective on what does and doesn't work about it, there is just no denying her screen dynamism. That's what they use to call "It".  

Here's how the stats break down and which legends Jennifer is toppling. Did the performers with similar records flame out early? Read on...

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Chart Revision & Trivia: Supporting Actress

June SquibbHaving recently seen Nebraska a second time (full review coming), I'm more confident that Alexander Payne favorite June Squibb (who played Jack Nicholson's wife in About Schmidt) can ride her scene-stealing laughs in the new film to a nomination. The film opened yesterday in limited release and though the Oscar attention is all on Bruce Dern at the moment, that could well change since the film is endearing on more than just the Dern-level.

Trivia Alert #1 If June Squibb is nominated she will be the third oldest nominee ever in the Supporting Actress category after Gloria Stuart (Titanic) and Ruby Dee (American Gangster)

August Osage County and Jennifer Lawrence trivia after the jump

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Hit Me With Your Best Shot: Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

While we're on the subject of Alfred Hitchcock, having just discussed the most memorable performances in his films, we thought we'd look at Hitchcock's own favorite Shadow of a Doubt (1943) for this week's Hit Me With Your Best Shot. I wasn't surprised that the film failed to score in that list we just made, if only because the whole cast is so memorable. How do you choose amongst them? What's more, the subject of the film is, if you ask me, not the gruesome crimes that are continually referenced but the family unit itself. How protective and proud of one's own blood should you be? How do you preserve the family's happy cohesion, whether real or imagined? What to do about the rotten apple in the bushel? 

Since Shadow of a Doubt (1943) is strangely underseen given Hitchcock's own love of it and the endurance of so many of his films, I don't want to spoil any of its surprises (the writing was Oscar nominated and deservedly so). But I will say that the surprises do not include the nature of Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten). He's bad news.

But how bad?

That's up to his family to gaily ignore or vaguely worry over and for his favorite niece and namesake (Teresa Wright) to puzzle out. Shadow of a Doubt has several delicious shots that are case studies in Hitchcock's mastery of visual storytelling and his glorious understanding of the power of shot variation (which is, if you ask me, the single element of filmmaking with the greatest depreciation in quality over my lifetime). I'm absolutely crazy about the way he shoots the growing conflict between the niece and her uncle... which you think will play out like cat and mouse but is closer to cat and kitten in its visual language since Young Charlie is no scurrying fool but a resourceful creature. My favorite shot is one that should be welcoming, but plays out with just as much potency as a disturbingly intense closeup of Uncle Charlie earlier in the film during a particularly nasty monologue.

Uncle Charlie is merely standing on the porch this time. Young Charlie would "like to pretend the whole dreadful thing never happened" but she knows that her "typical American family" home is no longer a sweet or safe one. 

Other Best Shot Choices...

Cal Roth on Hitchcock's repetitive "truth reveal" shot
Film Actually likes the fourth wall broken and Cotten's intriguing performativity
The Entertainment Junkie loves the camera's retreat from Teresa in the library
Antagony & Ecstacy puts a ring on it. It's one of his favorite Hitchcocks.
The Film's The Thing there's evil right beside you!
We Recycle Movies cheats by never getting past the opening credits! 

NEXT WEDNESDAY: The Color Purple (1985). Won't you sing 'Miss Celie's Blues' for us by selecting your "best shot" from that Spielberg hit?


Movie Love

Hello, readers of The Film Experience – Matt Zurcher, here. Aside from joining in on a few recent editions of Hit Me With Your Best Shot, it’s my first time writing at The Film Experience. I want to publicly thank Nathaniel for inviting me to cover for him today. In order to introduce myself, I wanted to make a little list focused on a trademark of this site – the adoration of actresses.

Is it possible to fall in love at the movies? I’m not talking about the fleeting arousal that Hollywood manufactures so well – I’m talking about that strange, lingering fantasy. Pauline Kael’s book titles – “I Lost It at the Movies,” “Going Steady,” “Reeling,” “When the Lights Go Down,” and “Movie Love” – all render moviegoing as a sexual experience. I can’t disagree with Pauline. There is something deeply intimate going on between the viewer and the screen. Fiction isn’t so far from Fact. When we’re properly pulled in, we don’t separate our feelings for the person sitting next to us from the person whose face is 20 feet tall.

These are five performances that continue to enchant me. Who have you fallen for in the dark?

5. Teresa Wright, The Best Years of Our Lives [Wyler, 1946]

I want to give the biggest high-five to the casting director of Best Years of Our Lives. Teresa Wright was not the most beautiful or charming choice to play the romantic lead and daughter of Frederic March’s WWII veteran. But her presence in Best Years is warmer than a Snuggie. She is the ultimate girl to take home to your parents. She isn’t sexualized and creates a portrait of calm concern for her family and relationships. She plays a young woman who believes in the value of emotional intimacy. Gregg Toland’s photography can’t be left out of this discussion. It’s a perfect example of Hollywood manufacturing the impossible ideal that pushes film so close to us.

four more lovely ladies after the jump

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