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Supporting Actress Smackdown of 1960
Shirley x 2, Janet, Mary, and Glynis. Who gets your vote?

"Janet Leigh should've won, but I feel like the fact that she was even nominated for that movie might've been a victory in itself." - Philip H.

"How great is it considering this was 59 years ago that three of these ladies are still with us and the two Shirleys are working on a semi regular basis." - Joel6 


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Entries in Freaky Friday (5)

Monday
Oct222018

Beauty vs Beast: Scream in your PJs

Jason from MNPP here - if you went and saw David Gordon Green's Halloween this weekend did you catch that voice cameo in the classroom scene? Mirroring a near identical scene in John Carpenter's original we see the granddaughter of Laurie Strode discussing the subject of Fate in her English class, and the voice of her teacher is none other than that of P.J. Soles, aka Lynda from the first movie and a total Horror Icon. Totally! And so we feel like giving some love to P.J. today, whose seal of vocal approval must count for at least 50 million dollars of its insane opening weekend box office. Totally. Just two years before Halloween Soles memorably co-starred in Brian De Palma's Carrie as Norma, another example of "girls making really bad choices in their best friends, and so let's face them down...

 

PREVIOUSLY Clearly we're on a Halloween kick, having gone the Jamie Lee Curtis route last week - only this time it was Linsday Lohan who got shivved with a knitting needle in the neck, JLC taking just under 90 PERCENT of your vote on our Freaky Friday poll. Ouch, way to kick a redhead when she's down, y'all! Said Mareko:

"Lohan is indeed great in this movie—it still pains me to think of what could’ve been had she stayed focused on her talent vs. celebrity—but Curtis is the real MVP, no question. Love that the NYT stanned for her so hard in 2003, as you do, and she should’ve *easily* scored an Oscar nom over the likes of Naomi Watts and even Samantha Morton."

Monday
Oct152018

Beauty vs Beast: Ye Olde Switcheroo Movie

Jason from MNPP here with this week's "Beauty vs Beast" -- this Friday the latest iteration of the freak-filled Halloween franchise hits theaters, but what of another Freaky Friday that cast the great Jamie Lee Curtis in a pivotal role? In 2003 - yes it turned 15 this past August, if you want to feel ancient) Mark Waters' remake of Freaky Friday with Curtis playing mama (then daughter) to daughter (then mama) Lindsay Lohan hit theaters, and it was a great big hit success with everybody. (I mean Jamie Lee should've snagged an Oscar nom, dammit.) So why don't we all eat a fortune cookie and repeat after me...

 

PREVIOUSLY We ventured back to Wes Anderson's Rushmore last week and y'all took Bill Murray's side in a squeaker (just 53%) - said lylee:

"Team Blume only because Max is so annoying (even though they're both annoying, and Blume in some ways has less excuse to be so immature)! Really, the beauty here is Olivia Williams, whom I found very appealing in this, if a little softer-edged than in her later roles. She's still one of my favorite slightly-below-the-radar actresses out there today."

Wednesday
Aug222018

Barbara Harris (1935-2018) 

by Nathaniel R

Barbara Harris in The Seduction of Joe Tynan (1979)

Sad news yesterday. One of the nation's best and most underappreciated actresses Barbara Harris passed away at 83 from lung cancer. The Chicago native got her start as a teenager on local stages and was an original member of Chicago's famed Second City troupe. Her intermittent screen career sprang initially from her stage successes. Though her filmography is mostly in the 1970s, she made a few 80s movies before retiring including Peggy Sue Got Married, Grosse Point Blank, and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.

Curiously for such a talented thespian of both stage and screen, she seemed somewhat ambivalent about her career, stating that she didn't miss acting after her retirement...

Click to read more ...

Friday
May272016

Tweetweek: Dumbo, Depp, Ghostbusters

It's a tie for Tweet of the week with the first win going to cartoonist Lucy Knisley for her sudden Mrs Jumbo tweet flurry... but there's more to come including Isabelle Huppert, Helen Hunt, Game of Thrones, Bridesmaids, and Michael Fassbender after the jump...

Tweet of the Week Part 1 

 

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Aug082013

The hidden gems of August

Tim here. August is upon us, the unloved bastard child of the summer movie season: understanding that the last three months have largely bled the audience dry, and knowing that it’s time for families to start getting ready for the upcoming school season, studios tend to leave this as a month for dumping all their projects that are too costly and high-profile to end up in the darkest hole the calendar has to offer, in January, but aren’t nearly polished enough to compete with the big expensive tentpoles of May and June. This means, in turn, that the wide release movies of August tend not to be as fussed-over and market ready as their big siblings, and while this means, far more often than not, that they are chintzy and unlovely things, it’s almost always the case that at least one or two releases every single year end up being one of the most unique and enjoyable films of the season, simply because a little bit of personality is actually able to sneak out through the test-market filters.

With this month serving as the last chance to redeem a bleary summer (my pick to hope and dream about: The World’s End), I wanted to visit some recent Ghosts of Augusts Past, films that linger in the memory far more than the more posh, A-list movies that preceded them to theaters.

 

August 2003 – Freaky Friday
A true surprise, of the best sort: Disney remaking a ‘70s film to vastly improved effect, with Lindsay Lohan in the entirely terrific performance that set her on the map as one of our most promising young stars before… you know… all that happened, and Jamie Lee Curtis in the last great role of her career as the businesslike mom whose body is invaded by a rebellious teen. And yes, I did say “great role”, for part of what makes this Freaky Friday so much better than it had the least right to be was that the filmmakers and performers never talk down to the material or treat it with any kind of cynicism or contempt. It is, quite possibly, the all-time masterpiece of the generally questionable “body swap” genre, with a profound sense of fun and zaniness of the most likeably high-spirited sort.

 

August 2005 – Red Eye
There was, in 2005, no reason to have any sort of expectation from director Wes Craven, an icon in the horror genre who hadn’t made a more than tolerable film in almost a decade (unless you see more to like in the plonking  Music of the Heart than Meryl Streep), Cillian Murphy hadn’t really made any kind of impression on mainstream filmgoers until just the month prior, with Batman Begins, where he was hardly the draw, and while those of us in the know had Rachel McAdams on our radar thanks to Mean Girls, the muscles she was flexing there were hardly well-suited to appearing in a genre film. And yet this threesome cranked out one of the most wonderful thrillers of the 21st Century, a sinewy beast with an outstandingly effective false first act, a bone-chilling middle that includes some of the most tension I’ve ever experienced in a movie theater, and a finale that pretty much deflated everything else and sucked.

But still! It’s basically just a beach read in cinematic form, and that giddy ride for the first three-quarters of the film is an absolutely terrific beach read, and in a no-nonsense 85 minute package, too.

August 2010 – Step Up 3D
Oh, stop it. I see that look. It’s the most absurdly fun kind of stupid trash, and no film since then has done a better job of using 3D in grandly expressive, playfully gimmicky ways. Which is about 180 degrees away from anything that any of us would identify as great cinema, but if you can’t get pleasure from the loopy “spitting slushies into the air” scene, I don’t know why you’d bother with summer movies at all.

 

August 2012 – ParaNorman
Beautifully mixing old-school technology – hand-made stop-motion animation – with bleeding-edge computer animation advances that the puppet animation of yore could never have imagined, the ghost story-comedy-adventure hybrid would be worth praising as one of the best family films of 2013 for its aesthetics alone. But that’s arguably not even the best part of a movie that treats the lives of its under-18 cast with considerable dignity and maturity, recognizing that modern kids are far more aware of what goes on in the world than modern adults are prone to admitting, unless it’s in the form of one of those grisly “quipping adults in child-size” precocious side characters. Nobody in ParaNorman is precocious, and that’s what makes its level, thoroughly grown-up storytelling so wonderful: here is a family movie that trusts its audience to be smart, to care about artistry, and to have an interest in engaging with the world. In addition to being a fun zombie attack movie, because kids, at least, haven't gotten tired of zombies yet.

Have any favorite late-summer movies? Share them in the comments!