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 Gemini, Cinephile, Actressexual. Also loves cats. All material herein is written and copyrighted by him, unless otherwise noted. twitter | facebook | pinterest | tumblr | instagram | letterboxd | deviantart 

 

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Which screenplays are most quotable?

"Inside out FTW. 'I loved you in Fairy Dream Adventure Part 7. Okay bye. I love you!'" - Teppo

"My number one that I now say whenever the occasion is delivered by Carol: 'It will get ugly. And we are not ugly people...'"- Jones

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Entries in Colorology (49)

Sunday
Jan102016

Golden Globe Arrivals

07:00 The 73rd Annual Golden Globes are here. And we're seated and not yet drunk, far from the Beverly Hilton (NYC to be precise).  I'm getting a late start. I blame pizza cravings. As I sat down with half of a pizza in my mouth -- I don't play around! -- Svelte Kirsten Dunst in autoerotic black (damn girl) was talking about her recent diet to plump up a bit for Fargo "you know... bread and cheese". Dear reader it's like I was on TV and she was making fun of me from home, the cheese dribbling down my chin.

07:08 Earlier on the TV we also learned that Alicia Vikander went sky-diving (okay) that maybe don't surprise Jamie Lee Curtis with a question about her mother's Golden Globe win for Psycho  ("you know... my mom's been gone a long time... we're moving forward... I'm happy to be here representing my show") and Jennifer Lopez had difficult describing the color of her dress. 

it's kind of a mustardy, yellow, marigoldy... I don't know."

I think you do know JLo.

07:12 Distracted momentarily by Monty-- who has refused to do his cat pundtiry this year. Sorry people. He's old, so give him a break -- I missed the context of Amy Schumer saying she has "old lady fingers" Anyone? 

07:18 At some point Joann Froggat from Downton Abbey reveals that she stans Cate Blanchett hard. This did not seem worth typing at the time because who doesn't. But still... She does.

07:20 Channing & Jenna (Mrs Tatum) don't sound like they're lying at all when they express surprise that people keep talking about the Lipsynch Battle. Which either suggests they are in a very tiny celebrity bubble world or they're good at playing their 'who us?' chill married couple persona.

07: 30 Kate Hudson and The Rock talking about Halloween for some reason 

 

07:31 We need to talk about Rooney Mara's braid.

07:34 Jacob Tremblay is already such a pro. Cackling when he stifles a "Duh!" and politely answers questions about whether he's seen The Force Awakens.

 

 

 

07:35 Amy Adams to Ryan Seacrest:

I'm so bad at winning awards!"

Tough problems.

07:42  Rami Malek reveals that he has been friends with Kirsten Dunst for a long time. Interesting.

07:45 Very cute exchange between Jennifer Lawrence and Katy Perry. Katy Perry saw Joy by herself in her sweatpants crying/inspired. 'I can make it in the world!' JLaw chuckles. 'I think you've already made it.'

07:46 I can listen to Saoirse Ronan talk about anything forever. I sometimes cant even register what she's going on about I'm so crushing on the vocals. Finally Saoirse says, without confidence, "I think I'm sitting at Amy Schumer and Jennifer Lawrence's table?" Doesn't this seem like something you'd commit to memory as soon as you heard?! 

08:00 ooh, show is starting. Byeeeee

 

 

Wednesday
Jan062016

Odile Dicks-Mireaux on Enhancing Saoirse's Journey in "Brooklyn" / Reuniting with Rachel Weisz for "Denial" 

Odile Dicks-Mireaux. Image via Female FirstThe thing about Brooklyn is that everyone can relate to it. Stories of immigration touch almost everyone, or at least run through their family's DNA. Even the move from one state with a personality quite unlike your original home, can feel like a reinvention.  Nearly a year after seeing Brooklyn for the first time it's strange to think that I worried that people wouldn't connect to it! Who needs sensationalistic drama when a story is this really. When it's power can sneak up on you? 

I had the pleasure of discussing this universal resonance, and the job of defining Eilis (Saoirse Ronan) through her costume changes with the designer Odile Dicks-Mireaux, who herself related to the story. Her mother was French and her father British and they met, both immigrants, in Brooklyn in the 1940s, and built a life in a foreign country together. Odile is London based and was best known, prior to know, with her frequently BAFTA nominated work on British television miniseries like Gormenghast and Great Expectations though she's also designed Oscar nominated dramas like The Constant Gardener and An Education

Here's our interview. 

NATHANIEL R: I first saw Brooklyn at Sundance and I loved it but I remember feeling that I had no idea how people would react to it when it was released.  Which in retrospect was kind of foolish of me.

 ODILE DICKS-MIREAUX: You never know when you're making a movie how it's going to turn out and whether it will hit a nerve. Would it be too much of a simple story or too old fashioned? So it's been a real pleasure that it's resonated. [More...]

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Dec292015

Interview: Carol's Production Design Judy Becker 

Judy Becker. Photo © Tom Uhlman at New York TimesThis won't have escaped you but we're a little bit obsessed with Todd Haynes's Carol. We tried to devote a week to it but the love can't be contained by calendars. The romantic drama about a glamorous society wife and a young shopgirl is rolling out slowly -- agonizingly slowly -- to more cities each week. It leads the Golden Globe nominations and though the Academy's decisions about the year's "best" are yet to come, there's reason to be hopeful that they'll embrace the filmmaker's triumphant return to the silver screen.

The Oscar-nominated production designer Judy Becker (American Hustle), is responsible for most everything you see onscreen in Carol from Therese's humble apartment to Frankenberg's Department Store, the Aird estate, and much more. "The props, there are close-ups on them, so I don’t know how you can say, that’s not important," she says passionately, underlining the fact that everything we see is part of 'the look'. She describes herself as a very hands-on designer and is sure this drives new members of her staff crazy but she has high praise for her frequent set decorator Heather Loeffler. "She never gets upset if I veto something but, at the same time, she brings a lot to the table and surprises me all the time with great stuff."

Though Becker is best known for her frequent collaborations with  David O. Russell this is not her first Todd Haynes film, having also designed his abstract Bob Dylan biopic I'm Not There (2007). We began our chat marvelling at his genius. Though I'm Not There was a larger scale task, essentially designing multiple worlds, Carol wasn't much easier for different reasons. "Every film has its challenges," she explains. And films as gorgeously realized as Carol don't happen without a lot of planning, work, and inspiration. 

Our interview is after the jump...

Click to read more ...

Monday
Sep282015

Beige & Slate Blue: Nancy Myer's "The Intern"


Kyle Stevens, author of 
Mike Nichols: Sex, Language and the Reinvention of Psychological Realism is here to review Anne Hathaway's latest.

 The Intern follows 70-year-old and retired Ben, played by Robert de Niro (who has never seemed more like a Bobby). Having enjoyed a happy and prosperous life, Ben now finds himself so uninspired by endless leisure activities that he decides he deserves another go on the merry-go-round. He lands the film’s titular position at a women’s clothing startup created and run by Anne Hathaway’s Jules, who, we are told, is a difficult woman to work for despite all evidence to the contrary. Ben and Jules become friends, as Jules realizes that even an old be-suited, briefcased, handkerchief carrying man—the icon of conservative, 1950s patriarchy—may have worth. Disturbing as this is, especially at first, The Intern gives us a real man-woman friendship—that rarest of on-screen sights, even if it is here rendered “safe” by Ben’s age.

De Niro and Hathaway shine, particularly in a hotel scene that gives them time to plumb the depth of writer and director Nancy Meyers’ characters. Meyers is one of our best character writers, but The Intern’s frenzied workplace setting doesn’t afford us time to fall in love with her creations as we did in, say, Something’s Gotta Give (2003), where Meyers simply put the camera in front of Diane Keaton and let her go. [more...]

Click to read more ...

Monday
Jul062015

'Red, red, red, red, red now...What am I gonna do'