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Oscar History
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The Film Experience™ was created by Nathaniel R. Gemini, Cinephile, Actressexual. All material herein is written and copyrighted by Nathaniel or a member of our team as noted.

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SAG Ensemble Predictions

"How is no one talking about the kids from IT????? They were amazing" - David

"I think Girls Trip makes it. Or st least Tiffany Haddish gets a nod. Right now, I’m thinking both?" - Roger

"In terms of crazy nominations that will never happen in a million years, I'd be elated to see something like The Beguiled or mother! nominated." - Film Junkie

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Monday
Dec112017

The Furniture: Matte Paintings at the End of an Era

"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber, is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

Over the course of the past year, I’ve done an informal retrospective series on the Best Production Design nominees of 1967. It isn’t an especially “New Hollywood” lineup, despite being the year of “Pictures at a Revolution.” Four of the nominees are lush period pieces, three of them lengthy musicals. They often feel like extravagantly-designed chaos, whirlwinds of sets and props that spin out of control. This is true of both the hilarious brawls of The Taming of the Shrew and the dated, stereotype-laden adventures of Thoroughly Modern Millie. Camelot, the winner, manages to split the difference between Old Hollywood excess and New Hollywood sexuality.

The final two films, both Best Picture nominees, are a bit less of a thrill. Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner and Doctor Dolittle are, respectively, the most realistic and most fantastical of the five nominees. However, despite their differences, they both underline the inadequate end-point of old-school studio design.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Dec112017

Golden Globe Nominations 2017

by Nathaniel R

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has reached its diamond anniversary. Alfre Woodard and Sharon Stone announced the nominations. Here are the Globe nominations in all their glory and folly (it's always a combo of the two with any awards body... though people tend to be harsher on the Globes in this perception matter). The biggest surprise was the big love for Ridley Scott's All the Money in the World (which no other awards group had screened to date) but the Golden Globes do like to be first as is always evident in their TV nominations which are generally quite favorable to new series (note the love for The Handmaid's Tale, The Marvelous Mrs Maisel, and more). As is also their habit they embraced a musical for their comedy/musical category giving a Best Picture nomination to The Greatest Showman

Among the saddest snubs (discussed in fuller detail here) were Jake Gyllenhaal for Stronger (though sister Maggie was nominated again for her amazing work on The Deuce), Regina Hall for Comedy Actress (somehow they needed Helen Mirren again), and a complete shutout for three high profile Comedies or Musicals: Girls Trip, Beauty and the Beast, and The Big Sick

FILM NOMINATIONS

Motion Picture Drama
Call Me By Your Name
Dunkirk
The Post
Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri

No surprises and all solid bets for Oscar nominations for Best Picture. The film arguably hurt most by an omission here is Darkest Hour since The Florida Project and Mudbound never seemed like "Globe" films, if you know what I mean. All the other nominations with commentary are after the jump...

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Monday
Dec112017

Would you rather...?

Mondays can be such a drag so let's fantasize that we're hanging with celebrities rather than returning to the day jobs, shall we? 

Would you rather
...eat oatmeal raisin cookies with Jessica Biel?
... get a quick drink with Wolverine and Professor Xavier?
... visit the ancient pyramids with Hilary Swank?
...hit the recording studio with Ben Platt?
...doing drag with Kristin Scott Thomas?
...can fruit with Dolly Parton?
...go to yoga with Lea Michele & Jonathan Groff?
...see the last Jedi with TV genius Bryan Fuller?
...welcome the snow with Lena Headey?
...or have a spontaneous dance party with Miguel Angel Silvestre?

[Pictures are after the jump to help you decide]

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Sunday
Dec102017

Podcast: A Proper Oscar Season Kick-Off

Katey, Nick, Joe and Nathaniel reunite to talk about the Oscar season as the floodgates open - Globe & SAG noms are about to hit! There are absolutely no spoilers in this so listen away.

Index (43 minutes)
00:01 Introductions & The Greatest Showman
02:11 Lady Bird's prospects
04:15 SAG ensemble possibilities
11:00 Girls Trip & Comedy Globe
16:00 Best Director -- easy or tough call?
21:00 Three Billboards, Darkest Hour, Screenplay race
30:00 Phantom Thread, The Post, Murder on the Orient Express, Visual and Sound categories
38:30 Roman Israel Esq
41:00 Colin Farrell & Goodbyes

You can listen to the podcast here at the bottom of the post or download from iTunesContinue the conversations in the comments, won't you? 

December 10th Oscar Check In

Sunday
Dec102017

Toronto, Boston, and NY Online Critics Join the Loud "Best" Chorus

by Nathaniel R

Our friends to the north in Toronto gave their biggest prize to a film of the south, Sean Baker's The Florida Project. In their supporting categories they stuck with the clear critical frontrunners Willem Dafoe (The Florida Project) and Laurie Metcalf (Lady Bird) both of whom are probably locking up Oscar nominations in their categories if not the win yet. Toronto's full awards plus the venerable Boston Society of Film Critics and New York Film Critics Online are after the jump...

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Sunday
Dec102017

You're Tearing Me Apart, Franco!: "The Disaster Artist"

By Spencer Coile 

Tommy Wiseau's The Room is a train-wreck. This is not a unique statement to make. Ask anyone who has seen it, and you'll surely be met with a healthy mix of laughter and endless quoting from 2003's "so bad it's good" disasterpiece. For years, fans have flocked to midnight showings at local theaters or gathered with friends around their TV to enjoy the messy writing, acting, and directing -- just three of the many hats Wiseau wore throughout filming.

What many fail to address, however, is that The Room was not always comedy; it began as a labor of love -- a melodrama with strong connections to Wiseau's personal (but very private) life. Adapted from the memoir by The Room co-star Greg Sestero and journalist Tom Bissell, James Franco dramatizes Wiseau's journey from obscurity to cult stardom in The Disaster Artist. But is his portrayal of Tommy Wiseau given the same loving treatment as Wiseau intended for The Room...? 

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