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The Film Experience™ was created by Nathaniel R. Gemini, Cinephile, Actressexual. All material herein is written and copyrighted by Nathaniel or a member of our team as noted.

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Best Hitchcock Man?

"Now this is a Sophie’s choice! Both are wonderful examples of using and subverting star personas, and the films themselves are glorious." - Ian O

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Friday
Jan122018

FYC: Michael Stuhlbarg for "Call Me By Your Name"

by Chris Feil

It’s the final day of Oscar voting before the nominations are announced before the nominations are announced on Tuesday January 23! Who knows if most Oscar voters have their nomination ballots in or not, but that doesn’t stop the rest of us from screaming last moment FYC hosannas for the procrastinators that mights be listening. My last minute plea would be for one performance that I find shocking to have received so little traction over the season: Michael Stuhlbarg in Call Me By Your Name...

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Friday
Jan122018

'The Shape of' the Critics Choice Winners List

by Nathaniel R

The Critics Choice Movie and Television Awards voted on by the BFCA members were held last night in California with Olivia Munn hosting. Aside from the color of the dresses and the Best Picture winner (Shape of Water) the night was faithful to the template set by the Golden Globes on Sunday in terms of the winners list and the political slant. Wonder Woman herself, Gal Gadot,  even got to make a speech with a special award (now that they've axed the acting in action film prizes).

In the night's most predictable turn of events, James Franco was a no-show (despite winning Comedy Actor again) after this past week of sexual misconduct claims. In the night's most upsetting development Lady Bird was entirely shut out of the winner's circle. In the night's "Biggest Waste of a Prize" moment, for some reason the group chose Three Billboards for Best Ensemble despite awarding McDormand and Rockwell trophies. (Aside from Woody Harrelson does anyone else in the cast demand a kind of "well, we gotta give this an ensemble prize, too!" enthusiasm? Especially when they had Mudbound, The Post, Dunkirk and Lady Bird right there as the other options!). Winners and a few more comments are after the jump...

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Friday
Jan122018

Months of Meryl: The Deer Hunter (1978)

Hi, we’re John and Matt and, in case you missed it, we are watching every single feature film starring Meryl Streep.

#2 — Linda, a working-class girl waiting for the return of her fiancé (and her fiancé’s pal) from Vietnam.

JOHN: The Deer Hunter is a mammoth film, both an epic tale of a soldier’s journey to hell and back (and back again), and an intimate communal study. Meryl Streep is Linda, engaged to Nick (Christopher Walken) but in love with his best friend Michael (Robert De Niro). Streep is given an underwritten part and asked to stand-in for ideas about femininity — and often simply femininity itself — in a picture dripping with testosterone. The film carefully takes stock of its male relationships, tracing masculine bravado from the Pennsylvania mines to the roulette dens of Vietnam, both critical of masculinity and uncommonly poignant in uncovering the deep bonds that exist between men. Linda often provides the film’s only tender balm to such machismo, but Streep transforms her Girl Back Home into an uncommonly rich creation. This is no flimsy Anne Marie. Linda is a supernatural creation of intense sincerity, relaxed yet energetic, guarded yet vulnerable, the film’s emotional core and its anxious heartbeat.

The Deer Hunter contains your favorite Meryl Moment, Matthew, right?... 

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Thursday
Jan112018

Blueprints: "Get Out"

We’re right in the middle of the awards race heat. Jorge takes a look at one of the most celebrated screenplays of last year, and how the meaning of its words change upon a second reading.

[Caution! Spoilers ahead for Get Out!]

 

Get Out has rightfully been one of the most acclaimed movies of the year. It’s genre-bending reflection on white liberalism is a seamless blend of comedy, horror, and satire. As it goes with all great movies, it all goes back to the script. Jordan Peele’s screenplay plays with the audience’s expectations masterfully, packing it with thrills and reveals and twists.

There is a twist about two thirds into Get Out, where a character who we thought was on Chris’s side (and therefore, the audience’s) turns out to have been in on it the entire time, the reveal done with only the jingle of keys... 

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Thursday
Jan112018

Directors Guild Nominations - Greta & Jordan, Yay!

by Nathaniel R

This year's 70th annual DGA Awards will be held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on February 3rd a month before the Oscars. The winner for Directing in Theatrical Features usually goes on to win the Oscar though historically there's about one exception a decade (Ben Affleck for Argo, Rob Marshall for Chicago, Ron Howard for Apollo 13,  etcetera-- basically don't have the "oh" sound in your movie title!-- did not repeat their wins at the Oscars and some of them weren't even nominated for the Academy Award). 

This year's lucky five nominees -- statistically you can expect four of them to pop up again with Oscar -- are:

THEATRICAL FEATURE

  • Guillermo del Toro, The Shape of Water
  • Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird
  • Martin McDonagh, Three Billboards...
  • Christopher Nolan, Dunkirk
  • Jordan Peele, Get Out

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Thursday
Jan112018

"Tully" Teases

Chris here. Has everyone come around to the comedy masterpiece that is Young Adult yet? If not, allow yourself a revisit in the coming months because we have an enticing reunion between its team. Charlize Theron returns for director Jason Reitman and writer Diablo Cody for Tully, a tale of contemporary suburban motherhood. 

This time around Halt and Catch Fire's Mackenzie Davis joins the collaborators as the titular nanny who helps Theron's mother cope with the demands of parenting, and they begin to establish a bond together as well. While Reitman/Cody are more widely known for their Juno collaboration which landed Cody an Oscar, this film looks to skew closer to Young Adult based on the just released teaser. The almost dialogue free 90 seconds is filled with brisk detail and tough honesty (not to mention a few belly laughs) that reminds immediately Young Adult's painfully precise opening sequence. Will this satiric look at new motherhood be equally spot on? Things are already promising for something special when the film opens April 20!

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